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Post op lymphatic massage can help ease recovery

If you have had plastic surgery, your doctor probably recommended post op lymphatic massage. Also called manual lymphatic drainage (MLD), lymphatic massage is a light-pressure technique that assists the flow of fluid away from a swollen area by using your body’s own systems. Unlike a Swedish or therapeutic massage, the lymphatic therapist uses a very gentle touch that stretches the skin and stimulates the lymph nodes.  

Post op MLD is not incisional drainage and should never hurt. This work draws swelling fluid towards the kidneys so that you basically pee it out. It does not involve opening surgical sites or pushing fluid to drains or openings. It can support recovery from any type of cosmetic procedure– liposuction, BBL, tummy tuck, gynecomastia reduction, gender confirmation surgery, etc…

What to expect from a post op lymphatic massage session 

Week one post op usually involves one or two sessions depending on which procedure you had. As a general rule of thumb, low volume lipo may require fewer sessions than other surgeries. The goal of the first couple of sessions is to move fluid which will reduce pain and swelling, lessen bruising, and promote healing. The therapist will use MLD techniques only. 

Similarly, week two post op focuses on draining lymphatic fluid back into the system and relieving pain and swelling. Depending on your speed of healing, gentle massage strokes may be introduced in this or the following week.  

Week three post op and beyond your therapist may start using additional techniques. Your therapist may incorporate warm stones, light massage techniques, and gentle cupping. Depending on your healing, these sessions may also focus on reducing “tight” or “hard spots” that have developed during the post-op healing process. Some procedures, like a tummy tuck, require a longer healing time before moving to this stage.

Post op MLD at Nimbus

Generally, we recommend a 45 minute session for your first session. We start before you come in with gathering information from you about your procedure, your healing so far, and your health background. At your first session, you will talk with your therapist about this information, any questions you have, and your areas of focus. The therapist will use their knowledge combined with your input, to develop a safe and comfortable session. In some cases, we may use special positioning to protect your procedure. For example, after BBL surgery, we use a special cushioning system to keep your butt lifted off the table. After tummy tuck, we use a cushioning to keep you from laying flat. During your session, your therapist will be happy to answer any questions that might come up. Afterwards, they will review with you and discuss future steps. Clients regularly report feeling less pain, less stiffness, and better movement after just one session.

At Nimbus we understand that plastic surgery can be life-changing and affirming. We also know that your body goes through a lot after surgery and requires a healing process. We work with each of you to create a personalized massage plan that supports you. No one-size-fits-all packages and no aggressive treatments– just you and your therapist working toward wellness. 


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Targeted Therapeutic Massage for TMJ Disoders can help reduce common symptoms including pain and stiffness.

Nimbus Massage now offers massage for TMJ Disorders. Our program is designed to relieve the pain and stiffness associated with the Temporomandibular Joint. The protocol, designed by a Massage Therapist who also worked for nearly two decades as a dental hygienist, addresses the muscles in the head, neck, and shoulders that contribute to TMJ pain and dysfunction.

Try the program to:

  • Reduce pain in the head, jaw, neck, and shoulders.
  • Be able to chew or yawn more easily.
  • Restore full opening and closing of the jaw.
  • Eliminate some types of headaches related to TMJ dysfunction.
  • Relieve tinnitus (ringing in the ears) related to TMJ dysfunction.

 

This joint in the jaw – in front of the ear where the jaw hinges – may develop a number of problems including arthritis, degeneration, trauma, postural problems, or repetitive stress. Any of these, or other, root causes may lead to muscular pain and tension in the immediate or surrounding muscles. People who grind their teeth, clench their jaw, sit with their head forward, or who have an uneven bite often develop TMJ disorders.

In addition to muscular pain in and around the jaw, people also commonly experience headaches; grinding, clicking, or popping in the jaw; the inability to fully open the mouth; tinnitus; dizziness; or sometimes pain and tension in the neck and shoulders.

Many people report that massage complements their medically-guided protocol to relieve pain and restore proper movement to the jaws. In fact, a recent research review concluded that conservative treatment, including massage, is an optimal treatment option for TMJ disorders.

Your therapist will methodically work though the muscles (including inside the cheek) commonly involved in TMJ disorders. Then they will apply soothing heat to relax the jaw, relieve tension, and get you back to pain-free living. Typically, this protocol requires between three and six one hour sessions with follow up visits as needed.

Medical Research on Massage for TMJ Disorders

2015 Systematic Review– Abstract.  “In conclusion, there is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance. ”

2014 Randomized Controlled Trial– Abstract.  “Massage therapy and the use of an occlusal splint had no significant influence on electromyographic activity of the masseter or anterior temporal muscles. However, the combination of therapies led to a reduction in the intensity of signs and symptoms among individuals with severe TMD and sleep bruxism.”

2012 Review Article– Abstract with free full text available.  “Massage is an effective method in treating temporomandibular disorders. Due to the (sic) manual therapy significant improvement may be seen in the subjective and objective health status of the patient.”

2011 Case Study– Abstract with free full text available. “Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress… more extensive studies are needed….”

 

 


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Targeted = Focused on your specific problem areas and goals.

Therapeutic = Having a therapeutic goal.

Massage = Working with the soft tissue for a therapeutic outcome.

Finding a way to succinctly describe what we do in a way that people will understand posed a unique challenge for us. We wanted to convey that we specialize in therapeutic styles of massage with a focus on helping people manage pain. We also see a lot of clients who have specific goals for their care, some of whom have complex medical histories. We wanted to describe what we do without using boring industry terms and jargon. All while staying away from the misnomers of Swedish and Deep Tissue Massage.

Targeted Therapeutic Massage seemed to fit the bill.

We use a through intake process to learn our client’s goals for the session, factors that contribute to their condition, and what has or hasn’t worked for them in the past. We also like to learn the client’s preferences for techniques. We then use this information to tailor our work each time someone comes in. In this way, each session is geared towards each client’s therapeutic goals.

Our therapists all have experience that includes actively learning new skills and staying up-to-date in the field. We know a number of different styles of massage and can blend them during each session in order to achieve the best results possible. If someone feels high levels of stress and anxiety then we use calming techniques to help relieve those feelings. If someone has chronic pain then we use pain-relieving techniques to help them manage their symptoms. If someone has a recent injury we use structural techniques to focus on helping them heal that area. We use our skills to target each person’s problem areas.

We do what we do so that we can help people live life just a little bit better.

 

 

 


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