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25/Sep/2018

Have you ever gone to a beginner yoga class and just felt like you couldn’t keep up? By the time you got yourself into one pose everyone had done two more and you didn’t know how to catch up? You thought yoga was supposed to be relaxing but this was just stressful!

Not for true beginners

Even a “Level 1” beginner yoga class can be intimidating or inaccessible if you lack experience, flexibility, or strength. Although most poses have multiple aspects to them, group yoga classes often assume that attendees already have a basic understanding of the form and function of common poses. Rather than teaching the “how to,” many classes simply lead students through a complex sequencing of postures.

If you have found yourself lost in a basic class check out a foundational group class or private lesson. These classes go more slowly and break down each pose so that you can get started the right way. With a good foundation of understanding, you can get more out of your yoga practice.

Starting from zero

Learn the correct alignment – A pose might look simple, but there’s actually a lot going on. For example, Mountain Pose (Tadasana) is a simple standing posture. However, it takes a lot of body awareness and muscle engagement to move away from our “natural” standing posture. By slowing down, you can take the time to understand what correct alignment looks and feels like. You also learn how to safely move into and out of a pose – many injuries come not from the poses themselves but from the transitions!

Learn modifications – With and without the use of props, find your personal version of a pose that works for and with your body. In Triangle Pose (Trikonasana) you might use a block to bring the ground up to your bottom hand, or you might engage a microbend in your knee to prevent hyperextension. A strap wrapped around your feet in Staff Pose (Dandasana) will give you something to pull towards if you can’t reach your feet.

Nimbus developed Yoga 001, a group class series, to help true beginners learn the foundations of yoga. Each class focuses on a handful of poses. The instructor breaks them down and demonstrates them. The students then get a chance to practice, ask questions, and learn adjustments. We also offer one-on-one instruction for those who prefer individualized attention.

A group or private beginner yoga class is a great place to help you start your yoga practice. With a bit of effort and focus, you’ll leave feeling more confident about attending group classes, following a video, or practicing on your own. 


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25/Sep/2018

Swedish Massage, arguably the most recognizable style of massage in the West, serves as a basis from which many massage therapists work. A practitioner can use basic Swedish techniques for a variety of therapeutic and relaxation purposes.  However, the term has become conflated over the years with relaxation work from the way that spas have marketed massage.

Not just relaxing

Many spas today use the term Swedish Massage to mean a nice relaxing session. They then use the term Deep Tissue Massage to mean a firm pressure therapeutic massage. We find this usage somewhat inaccurate. A therapist can not only apply Swedish techniques with firm pressure but can also target deeper musculature. Depending on the pacing, pressure, and intention, it may not feel relaxing at all. Furthermore, most modern Western therapists also mix in a variety of other techniques during a “Swedish” massage. For these reasons, we shy away from using the term on our menu at Nimbus.

The essence of Swedish Massage comprises three basic techniques- gliding, kneading, and that karate-chop thing that nobody likes. Developed as part of a physical therapy regimen called the Swedish Movement Cure, it originally spread through the Western medical community as a way to reduce muscular tension and aid in rehabilitation. The therapist uses the techniques with the intention to smooth, elongate, and spread the muscle tissue. They may aim to relax or invigorate.

Swedish at Nimbus

All of the therapists at Nimbus have studied traditional Swedish techniques though, depending on your session goal and their specialties, they may or may not use them. Each of our team members can also deliver a nice relaxation massage with a blend of techniques. If you are looking for a “Swedish Massage” akin to what you might get in a spa, book a “Massage for Wellness.” The therapist will still tailor your session to your individual needs, but will have an indication of your overall goal.

And, if you really do like that karate-chop thing, let us know… we’ll add it in!


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25/Sep/2018

While our main focus is on clinical and therapeutic massage we are not afraid of a little “woo.” At least, not woo that has some medical research behind it. Search “reiki” in PubMed (a trusted online database of medical research papers) and you will find a small number of studies that form a beginning of some positive research for reiki and other therapeutic touch  as a part of biofield therapy. The gist of the data so far indicates that reiki may have a positive influence on stress and pain relief.

Origins of Reiki

Reiki originated in Japan and it is essentially a laying on of hands. The history goes as follows, Dr. Mikao Usui went to the mountain, had a vision, and came back connected to the life force energy of the universe. He was able to heal people by touching them and tapping into this energy. He passed down this ability to other practitioners through an attunement process, which is how we still do it today.

In the original form of Reiki, the practitioner would place hands on the recipient wherever the energy felt out of balance. In the modern western version, the practitioner uses hand placements on the chakras which correspond to the rest of the body to facilitate healing. One science-based theory of how reiki works focuses on the possibility of one person’s electromagnetic field influencing the other’s. However, nothing has been proven through methodological study.

Traditionally, people have sought out reiki to heal and balance mind, body, and spirit. It  follows an integrated eastern philosophy of wellness in which any of these components alone or together may disturb overall well-being and lead to health problems. Each chakra corresponds not only to a physical part of the body, but to an emotional state, and a spiritual concept as well. Here is a quick and dirty list of the major chakras.

Chakras

1st/Root Chakra– At the base of the spine. Physically relates to the lower body and immune system– sciatica, low back pain, depression. Mental and emotional correlations include safety and security, basic physical needs, family, standing up for oneself.

2nd/Sacral Chakra– At the sacrum. Physically relates to the viscera, sexual organs, and hip area– urinary problems, problems related to the sexual organs, low back or hip pain. Mental and emotional correlations include blame and guilt, creativity, control, money issues, and ethics.

3rd/Solar Plexus Chakra– Above navel. Physically relates to the stomach, abdomen, and abdominal organs– ulcers, diabetes, GERD, liver problems, and adrenal fatigue. Mental and emotional correlations include trust, self-esteem, self-care, decision making, and honor.

4th/Heart Chakra– In the center of the chest near the heart. Physically relates to the heart, lungs, shoulders/arms, and chest– heart problems, asthma, allergies, upper back and shoulder pain. Mental and emotional correlations include love, resentment, grief, anger, forgiveness, loneliness, and self-centeredness.

5th/Throat Chakra– At the throat. Physically relates to the throat, neck, mouth, and glands– sore throat, TMD, scoliosis, and thyroid problems. Mental and emotional correlations include personal choice and expression, hopes and dreams, addiction, criticism, faith, and decision making.

6th/Third Eye Chakra– In the center of the forehead. Physically relates to the brain, nervous system, eyes, ears, nose, and glands– neurological or brain problems, learning difficulties, seizures, and hearing and vision problems. Mental and emotional correlations include intellectual ability, truth, wisdom, and emotional intelligence.

7th/Crown Chakra– At the crown of the head. Physically relates to the muscles, bones, and skin– chronic exhaustion, depression, and sensitivity to light and sound. Mental and emotional correlations include big picture thinking, spirituality, selflessness, values, courage, and trusting in life.

Experiencing

It can get complex and very in depth for those who appreciate the metaphysical. There can be levels, symbols, colors, crystals, sound, and smoke. There can be connecting of the worldly and ethereal. There can be inviting of enlightened beings.

People experience reiki in a variety of different ways. Some feel heat or vibration. Some see colors or visions. Some simply feel relaxed.  Some have emotional outpourings. Many specifically seek it out for this reason- it can bring up emotional or spiritual issues for processing. And for some, there is a profound connection that feels divine. The wisdom of reiki says that whatever the person experiences is exactly what they need for healing.

Another piece of the wisdom of reiki is that it “calls” to those who should try it…


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25/Sep/2018

Exploring massage as a complementary therapy for managing symptoms of trauma

The team at Nimbus Massage recently hired Hannah Bohn, MSW, a local mental wellness professional, to teach the staff a clinically-oriented class on PTSD and trauma. By expanding our knowledge base, we can better attune our sessions to our clients who have gone through a traumatic event. The root of helping people with their massage goals comes from understanding what people experience. Although research has just begun to explore how massage may help ease symptoms, we believe that massage can help survivors of trauma and people who live with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.*


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