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24/May/2017

Arthritis Feels Like …

Stiffness, aching joints, losing strength and movement: all hallmarks of “Ol’ Arthur” coming to visit. Over 50 million Americans live with arthritis. The most prevalent form of arthritis, osteoarthritis, occurs when the lining at the end of a bone thins. This leads to pain, stiffness, swelling, inflexibility, diminished strength, and decreased mobility.

Many people use therapeutic massage as a method of easing the chronic pain and stiffness associated with osteoarthritis. Although massage cannot reverse or cure arthritis, it can help relax the muscles that tighten around the joints, which eases pain. Many people also use massage to maintain their flexibility. In some cases, people use therapeutic massage to help manage their symptoms when they plan to get joint replacement surgery, but have to postpone.

The team and Nimbus has experience working with clients who have osteoarthritis. Many of our member have arthritis has a primary or secondary reason for seeking massage. When working with people who have arthritis, we take a gentle yet targeted approach around the affected joints. We tailor our techniques to each person’s goals – maintain flexibility, pain relief, pre-hab for surgery – and work with each person to individualize a program that works for them.

Before Your Massage

Some things to discuss with your therapist about when you come in for massage as a treatment for osteoarthritis:

  • Your treatment goals.
  • Details of your condition including its onset, symptoms, and severity.
  • How your condition is progressing.
  • Your past history of massage.
  • Other conditions you may experience.
  • Any medications you take and their side effects.

Knowing these things will help your massage therapist plan your session or program.

During Your Massage

During your massage, your therapist may use a blend of techniques depending on your goals.

  • Pain Relief: Find knots and tight areas and apply pressure, add heat, add soothing techniques.
  • Relieving Tension: Apply slow gliding to taut areas, add heat, apply pressure to relax muscle fibers.
  • Maintaining flexibility: Gently move the joint, gentle stretching, find and relax tight muscles.
  • Pre-hab for surgery: Lighter massage to manage stress and anxiety, stimulate lymph flow, and to maintain the  muscles.

The massage therapist will work with you to find a pressure that feels comfortable to you. We typically recommend a moderate pressure that feels comfortable but therapeutic. If anything during the session causes you pain, let the therapist know so they can adjust what they are doing. Massage is not a “no pain, no gain” type of therapy.

After Your Massage

After your session you should feel better. Mild soreness the next day sometimes happens if you have not had much massage. However, let your therapist know if you experience this so they can ease the pressure the next time. Many people find using moist heat, such as an aromatherapy pillow or a long shower, helps enhance the effects of the massage.

Generally speaking, massage work best for people who have mild to moderate cases of osteoarthritis. Although an experienced practitioner can also help people with more advanced cases. If you have a severe joint instability, the treatment focuses more on soothing and pain relief and less on changing the muscle tissue. In severe cases, we recommend checking with your rheumatologist or primary-care provider to make sure they approve of massage for your condition.

If you experience pain, stiffness, inflexibility or other symptoms related to osteoarthritis, massage may be a wonderful addition to your toolbox of ways to ease and manage your condition.

To delve deeper into the topic check out the Arthritis Foundation website section on massage.


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24/May/2017

Low back pain hurts and can result in pain when trying to stand up or shift position. Aching while trying to sleep. Trouble with bending or lifting.

Low back pain is the most common cause of missed time from work— it affects up to 80% of adults in the US at some point and can be completely incapacitating.

Many factors contribute to back pain including muscular injury, postural irregularities, obesity, problems with the spinal column and discs, and nerve problems. In some cases, no one culprit becomes evident– termed non-specific chronic low back pain. Despite its prevalence, low back pain remains a frustrating malady to treat.

Massage for Low Back Pain

Fortunately, for many people, massage can help ease low back pain. Although research has only just begun to support the efficacy of massage, the evidence that exists suggests both relaxation and therapeutic massage can reduce low back pain. In fact, recent medical guidelines list massage as a go-to therapy for low back pain. The team at Nimbus has helped countless people with their low back pain over the years. If muscular tension or injury has led to the pain, many people find relief in a few short sessions. For underlying factors that will not go away (arthritis, scoliosis, etc…) many manage their pain with ongoing treatments. Here is a list of some causes of back pain and some observations from the Nimbus staff about how massage may or may not help.

Massage may be most helpful for resolving pain or other symptoms in a short series of sessions:

– Muscular pain with recent onset.

– Nerve entrapment (by a muscle) with recent onset– including sciatica.

– Recent injury, sprain, or strain.

Massage may be very helpful for the following cases, however it may take a longer series of sessions:

– Chronic muscular pain.

– Nerve entrapment (by a muscle) that has been on-going– including sciatica.

– Past injury, sprain, or strain.

– Pain from postural or repetitive motion stress.

– Non-specific low back pain.

– SI Joint Dysfunction.

– Tendonitis.

– Piriformis Syndrome.

Massage may be helpful for relieving pain or other symptoms, but will not resolve the underlying issue:

– Arthritis including Osteoarthritis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Osteoporosis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, and Spinal Stenosis.

– Fibromyalgia.

– Scoliosis.

– Degenerative or other disc diseases.

– Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome.

Massage may not be helpful depending on the level of nerve vs. muscular involvement, may help pain or other symptoms:

– Ruptured disc.

– Nerve impingement (by bone)– including sciatica.

– As always, talk to your healthcare provider about your condition, and seek medical help for distressing, severe, or chronic pain.

What to expect during a massage

As with any complex condition, the treatment plan your massage therapist would suggest for your particular case will vary. The therapist will ask many questions concerning your pain, overall health, and history of massage and then discuss a plan with you. In some cases, the therapist may recommend a flowing massage using techniques to elicit relaxation and calm stress. A Massage for Stress & Anxiety can help back pain, and is a good fit for people who do not like structural massage. In other cases the therapist may recommend a more structural approach. If the pain just started recently, this would fall under the Massage for Aches & Pains category. For pain that has lasted more than three months, the Massage for Chronic Pain would be appropriate.  In either of these cases, the therapist may employ firm pressure to tender muscles; vigorous strokes to loosen stuck muscle fibers; sustained moderate pressure to ease taut areas; stretching and movement to move a nerve or muscle; and many more techniques. Depending on what you list as your symptoms, the therapist may check muscles in areas other than your low back including your legs, buttocks, and abdomen.

Home Care

You can also take steps to ease your pain at home. The American College of Physicians recently came out with a list of recommended approaches to easing back pain. Some examples of therapies you can use at home include the following. Apply heat, especially moist heat, like one of our Mother Earth Pillows or a soak. Engage in exercise, tai chi, or yoga. Try mindfulness techniques or progressive relaxation. You can also do self-massage at home with your hands or a gadget such as a trigger point tool or foam roller.

If low back pain hampers your daily living, massage and a good home care program, could help you get your pain under control, naturally.

 


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24/May/2017

Stretching is a mildly controversial topic.


For decades, many athletes have believed that a pre- and post-activity regimen of statically stretching individual muscles to or beyond their maximum length provided the following benefits: effective warm up, injury prevention, improved performance increased flexibility through permanent muscle elongation, and dissipation of knots in muscles.

However, current research leans away from such claims. Multiple studies have shown that pre-activity stretching can actually decrease performance, and makes no appreciable difference in frequency or severity of injuries. Other studies show that pre-activity stretching doesn’t warm and prepare the muscles as well as simply performing a scaled-down version of the activity itself, and that muscles cannot undergo plastic changes simply by being stretched.

So if stretching doesn’t deliver on injury prevention or performance improvement, what is it good for? Depending on how we define good:

|Good| adjective, better, best
1.morally excellent; virtuous; righteous; pious:
2.satisfactory in quality, quantity, or degree:
3.
of high quality; excellent.

Stretching Article by James Arbuckle

Per current research, the following can be safely claimed as benefits of stretching or what’s “good” about it: Temporary relief from muscle soreness | Improved peace of mind | Improved flexibility by increasing stretch tolerance.

Most people agree that stretching just feels good. It may not “cure” sore muscles, but it can provide some short-term relief. For many, stretching induces a peaceful state, and can be used as a meditation. And finally, stretching has been proven to improve flexibility, not by actually elongating muscles, but more likely, by increasing the athletes tolerance of stretching.

Yoga, a stretching-based activity, can provide all of these benefits. For clients who would rather have yoga “done to them”, we offer Thai Yoga Massage at Nimbus. In this modality, the therapist puts the client through various yoga poses and stretches, inducing a state of relaxation and invigoration. And for those who would rather be massaged on a table rather than a mat, we now offer a sixty-minute Table Thai session.

 

 


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24/May/2017

Therapeutic Hot Stone MassageClick To TweetTherapeutic Hot Stone Massage; so much more than a lady with an orchid.

by Kassia Arbabi

When you hear the words “therapeutic hot stone massage”, what images and thoughts come to your mind? Wait, don’t tell me. I’ve got this. A beautiful, pale woman stretches out on a luxuriously plush looking massage table. A pristine white towel is pulled back to hip level, and there’s an orchid gently shimmering in her hair. Sleek, black stones are perched down the length of her spine, and a delighted, dreamy smile plays at the edges of her mouth.

That orchid-bedecked woman has somehow wormed its way into all of our brains as a stand-in for therapeutic hot stone massage. I’m here to tell you a different story about the stones. Yes, they are a luxurious indulgence. Yes, they can put you into a deeply relaxed, rejuvenated state. Yes, the stones are sometimes placed along your body. But there is SO MUCH more possible with hot stone; so much more than rocks on a back and an orchid in your hair.

I developed therapeutic hot stone massage as a natural progression in my work doing massage for pain relief. I started running into people with long-standing pain issues. Issues that hadn’t resolved after years of attempts to get rid of the pain through massage, yoga, stretching, heat, ice, rest, etc…. They came in asking for deep tissue massage. Or relaxation massage. Or any kind of massage that would provide some kind of relief. And I began trying out the hot stones as a therapeutic tool to efficiently, effectively, and non-invasively cut through bound-up muscles, tight muscles, scar tissue, trigger points, and more. The weight of the stone combined with the therapeutic benefits of moist heat work together to melt muscles far faster than fingers alone. And they give you real results, quickly and effectively, resolving chronic issues like SI Joint dysfunction, shoulder issues, and low back pain.

The benefits of Therapeutic Hot Stone Massage are numerous.  There are the basic health benefits: improved local circulation, stress reduction, calming the nervous system, lowering blood pressure, stimulating lymph flow (bolstering immunity).  As well, the stones put your body into a deeply relaxed state that serves as a reset button for your nervous system, recharging all of your body’s own self-care systems.  That alone can be enough to relieve physical pain resulting from stress, tight, sore muscles, or an injury.

The stones are also a powerful and effective tool for specifically addressing areas of chronic pain or tension, freeing up areas bound by scar tissue, or assisting an injured body part return to its full functionality.  And it’s a great companion therapy for physical therapy and other injury recovery therapies.  The heat from the stones allows the therapist to penetrate muscles more deeply than using hands alone, while causing less pain and discomfort.  The benefits of hot stone are deeply therapeutic, while the experience is gentle, non-invasive, and rejuvenating.  Who knew—so many benefits, no orchid required!

Kassia Arbabi is a Licensed Massage Therapist and team member at Nimbus Massage. She has training in Connective Tissue Massage, Myofascial Massage, Neuromuscular Therapy, Ortho-Bionomy, Stretching, Hot Stone Massage, and Polarity Therapy.

 


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24/May/2017

A Pain in the Neck

As the name implies, tech neck is the result of spending too much time engaging with technology. Have you spent the latter part of your career hunched over a screen only to get off work and go hunch over another screen? Do feel an anxious twinge every time you hear a ping that sends you lunging for your phone to furiously reply to whatever has hit your inbox/social media/text messaging? Perhaps hours of binge-watching “Stranger Things,” or Buffy (again), has you glued to your device … We have myriad fun, and less fun, device diversions these days that have us craning forward to stare deeply into the back-lit blue light. And our necks hurt.

Your momma was right, you shouldn’t slump. Unfortunately today’s tech world often lures us into a hunchy bunchy bad-for-your-posture slouch that puts a lot of strain on our necks, upper backs, and shoulders (and really the rest of us, too). Add to that the fact that a lot of people tense their neck and shoulder muscles (shoulders down!) when under stress, and we’ve got a recipe for tech neck. Chronic pain in the neck, back, and shoulders.

Massage Can Help Ease Neck Pain from Tech Neck

More people come to our massage team seeking relief for tech neck than any other pain complaint. We literally see this every day, usually multiple times per day. Repeatedly jutting the head forward, rounding the shoulders, and holding the arms out in front of us, puts a lot of strain in the back; and most of us live perpetually in this forward posture. Desk, car, couch– even doing “active” things like household chores or eating can put us into this position.

 

A good massage therapist can methodically work through your neck and shoulder girdle to relieve pain from tense knotted muscles. By working though each muscle group thoroughly, we can find tender points and apply techniques to work out the soreness and relax the muscle tissue. We typically ask for more feedback than we would in a relaxation massage to ensure that you get better results– especially if you have long-term or more intense aches.

 

To fully eradicate pain from tech neck you will likely have to do some PT and make some lifestyle changes (and rule out underlying conditions with your medical team). However, massage can make an immediate difference in your pain and tension. For stubborn, long-term problems, a series of sessions will provide more benefit than a single session. Or, if you cannot take steps to change your patterns, a routine of on-going massage can help mitigate your pain until you get to a different place in your life.

Using a Targeted Approach

With a case of tech neck, we recommend trying a targeted approach in which we focus solely on your neck, back, and shoulders for the duration of the massage so we have more time to spend working through your taxed muscles.  Spending more time addressing these areas and layering down through your muscle tissue, can make a big difference in your results. Once we get this area feeling better, we can zoom out and address other contributing factors.

 

Massage is definitely worth a try to ease the pain in your neck. You get to disconnect from the wired world for an hour or so and reconnect with your body. And come out feeling less tense, less in pain, and maybe even a little taller.


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24/May/2017

In 2016 the Massage Therapy Foundation & American Massage Therapy Association jointly commissioned the Samueli Institute to perform and independent review of the current research on massage for pain management. After extensive review of the literature, the researchers confirmed the practical experience of massage therapists and clients. Massage Therapy relieves pain.

What this means for consumers

Now massage consumers can have even more confidence in their choice to use therapeutic massage for muscular pain and for chronic pain. As the number one reason people go to a primary care provider, pain is a major health concern. The medical community now has stronger reasoning for recommending massage as a means to manage pain to their patients. Although massage helps people in many other ways, it now has solid scientific backing as a safe and effective method of controlling pain.

What this means for the massage industry

This landmark study provides the massage industry with better credibility as a treatment option for pain management. It opens the door for more medical professionals to recommend massage to their patients. This has long-term potential to lead to more massage therapists working as a part of an integrated care team. Or, for the optimistic, even some increased opportunity for insurance to cover medically recommended massage. Some people also see massage as fitting in as an option for helping reduce opioid dependence by potentially leading to less reliance on medications for pain management. Furthermore, new massage research funding could follow this positive review.

More details on the pain management research

Having research independently reviewed and verified by an unaffiliated scientific organization signifies quality and integrity in the work. The Samueli Institute applies a rigorous academic approach to research in, among other things, complementary therapies. They work with the US Military, the medical community, and private businesses who have an interest in complementary and integrative approaches to wellness. For this meta-analysis, they formed a team comprised of researchers, massage therapists with a background in research, and organizational leaders with a background in research.

In order to form their conclusions, the research team began with thousands of articles and then used a systematic process to find the most relevant research. They then condensed the findings from 67 research articles on the effects of massage on pain levels and analyzed the data collectively. The research covered multiple different styles of massage, so it speaks to the efficacy of massage in general. It looked at pain management in multiple categories including chronic pain, fibromyalgia, headache, and muscle pain. It also covered quality of life. The researchers additionally looked at the effect of massage on activity, but found that there were not enough quality studies to make a determination.

Overall, based on the effectiveness and safety of massage therapy, the study recommended the use of massage as a way to manage pain.

Read the full study in the journal Pain Medicine.


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24/May/2017

Throbbing, aching, pounding, stabbing, squeezing … we do not want these things done to our heads! Headaches and migraines can make us want to make the whole world disappear. For those of us who struggle with chronic or recurring headaches, well, it just plain sucks.
Many massage clients who suffer from tension/muscular headaches and migraines indicate that regular massage reduces the frequency and severity of their symptoms. Sometimes, it can also diminish the pain associated with an active headache. Massage is particularly good at helping if there is a stress or muscular component.
When working to alleviate headaches, massage therapists work through the muscles of the scalp, jaw, face, neck, shoulders, and upper back to find and relieve trigger points, taut bands, and tight areas. Your therapist may also blend in general relaxation work, aromatherapy, craniosacral therapy, heat or cold, or stretches to help get you back into shape.
Some common culprits leading to headaches include stress, TMJ, poor posture, trigger points in the neck and shoulders, sinus pressure, vascular issues, and nerve issues. Massage therapists learn techniques designed to work directly or indirectly on most of these underlying causes.
A medical study on massage for migraines seems to support the anecdotal evidence with positive preliminary results. Participants reported reduced frequency of migraine following massage (plus improved sleep). One preliminary study on massage for tension type headaches (TTH) found that Trigger Points “are important components in the treatment of TTH…” but that the placebo also led to people feeling better. Other studies (according to Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction: The Trigger Point Manual by Travell & Simons) have found similar conclusions and have further linked some migraines, and other types of headaches, to Trigger Points.
Not all headaches are created equal. The ones that, so far, seem to have the best chance at responding to massage include: tension headache, migraine, TMJ-related headache, and cervicogenic headache. In our experience working with people with each of these types of headaches, we have seen good results in lessening the frequency and severity of headache-related pain. Typically, a series or regular routine of massage has a better chance at helping people with chronic headaches.
We can work with you to see if massage or a massage program can work for you.
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24/May/2017

Living with fibromyalgia can be disheartening, depressing, and, while in the depths of the worst days, downright bleak. No one wants to lose the ability to conduct a normal, pain-free, easy-functioning life. To worry whether they will have enough energy each day to get dressed and go downstairs. To have to routinely say “no” to a lot of life’s little pleasures (and routines!). Although not an easy process, most people, with physician-guided trial and error, can find a set of management strategies that help them minimize the chronic widespread pain, fatigue, and other symptoms that go along this syndrome.

While not a magic bullet, to be sure, routine massage has emerged as one management tool that seems to really help people who suffer from fibromyalgia get back to fuller, more pain-free living. Partnered with the right diet, pharmaceutical, and exercise program- a well-tailored massage program can aid people in reclaiming some of what is lost to fibro. However, no two people are alike, so part of finding the right massage for fibromyalgia is creating a partnership with a massage therapist who understands fibro and working together to discover what works best for your body.

Generally speaking, myofascial techniques, stretching, and the feather-light lymph massage have gotten some good press for helping alleviate the tight muscle feeling and fatigue associated with fibro. Massage also appears to improve pain, depression, sleep disturbance, anxiety, and overall quality of life. One review, interestingly, found that the only style of massage (that has been studied, many haven’t) that appeared to have little clinical effect on fibromyalgia was the most common, Swedish. One study found that longer-term programs seemed to optimize the effects of massage. Unfortunately, the study of massage for fibromyalgia is still in its infancy. The gist of the data is that massage can help, but how or to what extent and in which exact applications is still unclear.

Since over-stimulation can cause flare-ups, people who receive massage for fibromyalgia often have to start “easy” and habituate to the work. If you have never had massage for fibromyalgia before, or had one that caused a flare-up, a 30 minute lighter pressure massage is a good place to start. Most find that they become less sensitized to massage over time and that the pressure and style of massage that works for them becomes slightly more aggressive. Some even ultimately do well with very deep pressure trigger point work. Keep in mind that sometimes you need to go back to a lighter pressure if you have a set back or if you begin reacting differently to deeper pressure work.

Some key things you may encounter during a massage for fibromyalgia include:

  1. Lighter pressure (at least to begin with).
  2. Slow work, often with long holds on areas of taut tissue, that gently work into the layers of muscle.
  3. Gentle stretching with long(er) holds that wait for the muscles to relax.
  4. Some focused work on tender points and knots as you become used to massage, or if you already know that deeper pressure works well for you. (Slow often still works better.)

Make sure you have in in-depth intake conversation with your therapist discussing how you experience fibro and your goals. Let your therapist know if you have sensitivity to heat or cold, skin reactions, fibro fog, insomnia, IBS, etc… Also discuss your general wellness, other health concerns, and past history with massage. Once you get into the session, expect to give some feedback so that the therapist can adjust to what you feel. Finally, pay attention to how your body responds to the work in the days following the session. Did you flare up? How much? What type(s) of relief did you notice? How long did the relief last?  Give that feedback to the therapist who will use it to tailor your next session.

If you have received a diagnosis of fibromyalgia and have not yet tried massage as a complementary therapy, it is worth seeking out a qualified provider to try a few sessions. If you have tried once or twice and had a flare up, it may still be worth finding a therapist who has specific experience working successfully with people who have fibromyalgia– interest, training, and experience on the part of the therapist can make a big difference.

And remember, you can do it!

 

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24/May/2017

Targeted Therapeutic Massage for TMJ (TMD) can help reduce jaw pain, stiffness, and more

Nimbus Massage now offers massage for TMJ (TMD). Our program is designed to relieve the pain and stiffness associated with Temporomandibular Disorders (commonly referred to as TMJ by laypersons and TMD by medical professionals). The protocol, designed by a Massage Therapist who also worked for nearly two decades as a dental hygienist, addresses the muscles in the head, neck, and shoulders that contribute to TMJ (TMD).

Try the program to:

  • Reduce pain in the head, jaw, neck, and shoulders.
  • Be able to chew or yawn more easily.
  • Restore full opening and closing of the jaw.
  • Eliminate some types of headaches related to TMJ (TMD).
  • Relieve tinnitus (ringing in the ears) related to TMJ (TMD).

 

This joint in the jaw – in front of the ear where the jaw hinges – may develop a number of problems including arthritis, degeneration, trauma, postural problems, or repetitive stress. Any of these, or other, root causes may lead to muscular pain and tension in the immediate or surrounding muscles. People who grind their teeth, clench their jaw, sit with their head forward, or who have an uneven bite often develop symptoms of TMJ (TMD).

In addition to muscular pain in and around the jaw, people also commonly experience headaches; grinding, clicking, or popping in the jaw; the inability to fully open the mouth; tinnitus; dizziness; or sometimes pain and tension in the neck and shoulders.

Many people report that massage complements their medically-guided protocol to relieve pain and restore proper movement to the jaws. In fact, a recent research review concluded that conservative treatment, including massage, is an optimal treatment option for TMJ (TMD).

Your therapist will methodically work though the muscles (including inside the cheek) commonly involved in TMJ (TMD). Then she or he will apply soothing heat to relax the jaw, relieve tension, and get you back to pain-free living. Typically, this protocol requires between three and six one hour sessions with follow up visits as needed.

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The Rabbit Hole-

Medical Research on Massage for TMJ (TMD)

2015 Systematic Review– Abstract.  “In conclusion, there is widely varying evidence that MT improves pain, MMO and PPT in subjects with TMD signs and symptoms, depending on the technique. Further studies should consider using standardised evaluations and better study designs to strengthen clinical relevance. ”

2014 Randomized Controlled Trial– Abstract.  “Massage therapy and the use of an occlusal splint had no significant influence on electromyographic activity of the masseter or anterior temporal muscles. However, the combination of therapies led to a reduction in the intensity of signs and symptoms among individuals with severe TMD and sleep bruxism.”

2012 Review Article– Abstract with free full text available.  “Massage is an effective method in treating temporomandibular disorders. Due to the (sic) manual therapy significant improvement may be seen in the subjective and objective health status of the patient.”

2011 Case Study– Abstract with free full text available. “Results include an increase in maximal opening from 3.1 cm to 3.8 cm, an overall increase in neck range of motion, a decrease in muscle hypertonicity using the Wendy Nickel’s Scale, a decrease in pain from 7/10 to 3/10 on a numerical pain scale, and a decline in stress… more extensive studies are needed….”

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24/May/2017

Recurring pain can be managed through massage, and many people seek massage for help dealing with consistent problem areas.  Repeating an action over and over stresses the muscle and leads to tension. Continuing the same repetitive motion disallows the muscle to heal properly.  Over time, the body reacts by tightening everything up in that area in an attempt to give it needed support. Which often leads to recurring, and sometimes chronic, pain and tension– sometimes referred to as a repetitive stress or repetitive motion injury.

In many cases, the recurring pain is work-related; and while we’d all love to take a month off to rest our bodies, reality usually forbids it.  Thus we must create a management program to help reduce symptoms and manage pain. Massage, stretching, exercise, mindfulness, acupuncture, and lifestyle adjustment are all ways to help get on top of problem areas.
Check this list of “warning signs” that indicate repetitive stress injuries from www.massagemag.com (Massage Magazine’s website).

“• Stiffness
• Weakness
• Fatigue
• Difficulty using body part
• Waking up with pain
• Tingling, numbness and burning
• Recurring pain
• Lack of endurance
• Feeling of heaviness in body part”

Feeling these sensations consistently in an area tells you that you need to start taking steps to care for that area. Your massage therapist can help you jump start your program to take control of your pain cycle. By applying directed techniques, targeted therapeutic massage can disrupt the pain cycle and relax the tension in the muscles and surrounding tissues. It can also help relieve any stress component that may be contributing to muscle tension.
If a problem is relatively new or low-intensity, often a couple of sessions can make a big difference. For longer-term problems it may take a series of sessions for optimal results. For those who are not in a position to make lifestyle changes to stop perpetuating the problem, a regular routine can help you manage and mitigate flare-ups for better over all daily living.
So whether you have tech neck from sitting on a computer, shoulder pain from working with your arms out in front of you, or achy feet from standing all day, massage can help you feel  better and get back to what you do.
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